1. by Eisen Bernard Bernando

    (Source: eisenbernard)

  2. FHM’s racist cover. FHM Philippines pulled an issue that featured actress, Bela Padilla, “stepping out of the shadows” of three dark-skinned models after outcry erupted over the inherent racism of the cover. The uproar has led to a debate about racism in the country - the magazine’s publishers (and even Padilla) didn’t initially see anything wrong with the cover, while many felt it depicted an “obsession with the White Ideal.” The publishers have since apologized and issued a new cover for the magazine.
Previously in racist magazine covers: Vogue, Vogue again, Time.

    FHM’s racist cover. FHM Philippines pulled an issue that featured actress, Bela Padilla, “stepping out of the shadows” of three dark-skinned models after outcry erupted over the inherent racism of the cover. The uproar has led to a debate about racism in the country - the magazine’s publishers (and even Padilla) didn’t initially see anything wrong with the cover, while many felt it depicted an “obsession with the White Ideal.” The publishers have since apologized and issued a new cover for the magazine.

    Previously in racist magazine covers: Vogue, Vogue again, Time.

  3. Proud Middleton! A file photo chosen for the cover of Tatler “looks like one of those Jesus plates you see at thrift stores. Tatler even made sure Kate Middleton’s head was positioned just like Mary’s.” [jezzy]

    Proud Middleton! A file photo chosen for the cover of Tatlerlooks like one of those Jesus plates you see at thrift stores. Tatler even made sure Kate Middleton’s head was positioned just like Mary’s.” [jezzy]

  4. The best and worst magazine sellers of 2011. According to the Audit Bureau of Circulation, Mila Kunis was the most profitable cover girl last year. Kunis graced the cover of “GQ’s best selling issue, drove sales up 15% with her W cover and over performed with Cosmo.”

    Meanwhile, Justin Timberlake tanked (and not just at the box office, ahem, In Time). His two covers, for W and Esquire, were the worst-selling issues for each publication (selling 15K copies and 73K copies respectively). [source]

  5. The 154-year-old publication, founded by Ralph Waldo Emerson, now makes more revenue from digital ad revenue than print ad revenue.
According to The New York Times, it is rare for any magazine publisher to do this and The Atlantic is the first major publication to pull in a “bulk of its advertising revenue from online resources.” 
The magazine expects to make $18.6 million from advertising revenue. However, its October issue did sell more ads than any other issue since 1999. This however, does not reflect the magazine industry as a whole. 
Additionally, The Wall Street Journal reports “the number of ad pages in monthly publications declined 6.8% in the fourth quarter from a year earlier.”
The revenue trends for the past three years are as follows: 2009, -20%; 2010, +4%; 2011, -3%. Or as Gawker puts it: “A crash, a peek of hope, and then a retreat” as reality sets in.

    The 154-year-old publication, founded by Ralph Waldo Emerson, now makes more revenue from digital ad revenue than print ad revenue.

    According to The New York Times, it is rare for any magazine publisher to do this and The Atlantic is the first major publication to pull in a “bulk of its advertising revenue from online resources.” 

    The magazine expects to make $18.6 million from advertising revenue. However, its October issue did sell more ads than any other issue since 1999. This however, does not reflect the magazine industry as a whole. 

    Additionally, The Wall Street Journal reports “the number of ad pages in monthly publications declined 6.8% in the fourth quarter from a year earlier.”

    The revenue trends for the past three years are as follows: 2009, -20%; 2010, +4%; 2011, -3%. Or as Gawker puts it: “A crash, a peek of hope, and then a retreat” as reality sets in.